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Global Dignity Day 2016 takes place October 12th!

View a recording of the 2015 national video conference./p>

Global Dignity Day Canada

The Mission of Global Dignity is to implement the universal right of every human being to lead a dignified life. We all have the ability to increase the dignity of others and thus we increase our own dignity. The more dignity we have, the brighter our world will be.

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  • Global Dignity Day Canada-image
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Global Dignity Day Canada

The Mission of Global Dignity is to implement the universal right of every human being to lead a dignified life. We all have the ability to increase the dignity of others and thus we increase our own dignity. The more dignity we have, the brighter our world will be.

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@GLOBALDIGNITY

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Sign up your school to take part in this year's Global Dignity Day Events!

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Join us in helping raise awareness in support of Global Dignity Day – Canada!

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Participating Schools

Meet some of the Canadian schools taking part in GDD!

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About

Established in 2005, by HRH Crown Prince Haakon of Norway, Operation HOPE Founder, Chairman and CEO John Hope Bryant and Professor Pekka Himanen, GD is linked to the 2020 process of the World Economic Forum, in which leaders from politics, business, academia, and civil society join efforts to improve the state of the world. GD is an independent, non-political organization focused on empowering individuals with the concept that every human being has the universal right to lead a dignified life.

Global Dignity Day Canada

The Eighth Annual Global Dignity Day is scheduled for Wednesday, October 21th, 2015, and will be celebrated in over 50 countries around the world. This year we build upon the great success of last year’s event during which hundreds of thousands of youth participated across 50 countries.

On this day, role models from across the country – including parents, educators, athletes, Senators, former and current Members of Parliament as well as international business and thought leaders – join thousands of volunteers to make the day possible. In Canada, role models will speak with youth across the country from Nunavut to British Columbia with the aim to instil a positive, inclusive and interconnected sense of value in young people that will guide them as they grow. Within this year’s theme, “the many faces of dignity”, students will be able to explore several facets of dignity.

Our partners from last year include the Canadian Commission for UNESCO, TakingITGlobal, Right To Play and The Heroa Project: dedicated to working with youth to realize the hero that lies in everyone. Overall, it is our hope that by acknowledging existing inequalities, students will see that they have the ability to impact and enrich the lives of others through their own actions and choices, thereby promoting awareness and a social consciousness during a key time in their development.

Mission

The mission of Global Dignity is to implement the universal right of every human being to lead a dignified life. We all have the ability to increase the dignity of others and thus we increase our own dignity.

The dignity approach works on all levels: it works for children and for adults, it works for men and for women, and it works on the micro and macro level.

Global Dignity is an autonomous non-profit, non-criticism and non-partisan initiative. We wish to be inspiration-based: commending and encouraging best practice and dignity-centered leadership. The concept of global dignity includes the following five principles:

1. Every human being has a right to lead a dignified life.

2. A dignified life means an opportunity to fulfill one’s potential, which is based on having a human level of health care, education, income and security.

3. Dignity means having the freedom to make decisions on one’s life and to be met with respect for this right.

4. Dignity should be the basic guiding principle for all actions.

5. Ultimately, our own dignity is interdependent with the dignity of others.

Register

Fill out the form below to register for Global Dignity Day 2016. We will contact you.

Tools

At a Dignity Day session, facilitators – people who make the Dignity Principles their own – go into schools and talk with the pupils about dignity. Facilitators can be plumbers, health workers, bankers… in short, anyone that want to see young people become their best self can be a role model.

A typical Dignity Day session lasts about two hours. The facilitator usually starts by telling his or her own story about dignity. Then, the children are asked to define dignity in their own words. After discussing the Dignity Principles, the children tell their own stories in front of the class. Finally, they typically write a letter to themselves stating what they want to achieve for themselves and others through dignity. A year later, these letters are sent back to the students.

Please download the complete Facilitator’s Guide for more details on hosting your own Dignity Day event. To hold a quick dignity day session, consult the Global Dignity Day Canada Express Guide (each session within takes less than 30 minutes with very little prep time).

Submit Your Dignity Story

Everybody has a unique dignity story about themselves, a person, event or place. As part of Global Dignity Day Canada, we’re asking you to submit your dignity day story to share with students across Canada and from around the world. It is our hope to showcase many of these submissions with the support of our National Role Models at the Global Dignity Day Canada National Capital Event in October.

By sharing our stories, we hope we can better understand each other, our experiences and why its important to live with mutual understanding, respect and compassion for ourselves and everyone around us. Please download the guidelines to submit your unique story and share what dignity means to you!

The “less. more.” Campaign

less heartbreak more peace

This year Global Dignity has embrased the “less. more.” campaign. Print and share or style your social media profiles with these campaign materials to show support and help spread the word (click to view, right-click to save).

Twitter Headers

Facebook

Print Materials

Reference

Spread The Word – Show Your Support

Want to help spread the word about Global Dignity Day and show the world your support for a great cause? Right-click and save either of these badges and add them to you web site or blog! We'd appreciate it if you could link the images back to us too.

We've also got a great "Faces of Dignity" poster you can download here to print out and post at work or school!

Teaching Video: How to hold a Dignity Day session

This video has been produced to give you as a voluntary facilitator a brief introduction to Dignity Day and your role and responsibilities. Introduction by Global Dignity co-founder His Royal Highness Crown Prince Haakon.

Carleton Hosts Global Dignity Day Videoconference

On Oct. 21, 2015, Carleton University hosted a live national videoconference as part of Global Dignity Day, an international day to empower youth with dignity. Thousands of young Canadians joined 400,000 students across the globe in what was the fourth annual celebration of its kind in Canada.

» Read the full story on Carleton’s Newsroom

 

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Mrs. Universe joins thousands for Global Dignity Day

Ottawa, October 21, 2015 – Today, thousands of students across Canada joined 400,000 of their peers, in over 60 countries, in celebration of the international day to empower youth with dignity, Global Dignity Day.

This year’s celebration of Global Dignity Day in Canada, hosted by 1125@Carleton, at Carleton University, connected students and young leaders from Kitiganzibi High School and Carleton University, with 2,000 students from coast-to-coast through a live international videoconference.

The videoconference livestream can be viewed here.

Highlights of today’s event included a throat singing performance from Arviat, Nunavut, and dignity stories from Rwandan Genocide survivor and public speaker, Emery Rutagonya, and Global Dignity Canada’s National Role Model, Ashley Callingbull (recently named Mrs. Universe).

“I think [Global Dignity Day] is so important because we should always be proud of who we are,” Mrs. Callingbull said in a video released today for Global Dignity Canada.

“The only thing that’s important is how we feel about ourselves, and the life we lead.”

Approximately two minutes in length, the video is now available online and can be shared in classrooms and youth centres across the country. See Mrs. Callingbull’s full video here: http://bit.ly/1M68jz1.

Global Dignity is an independent, non-profit, non-political organization focused on empowering young people with dignity. Established in 2005 by HRH Crown Prince Haakon of Norway, Operation HOPE Founder John Hope Bryant and respected Finnish professor Pekka Himanen, it aims to inspire respect, self-esteem and tolerance of diversity, as well as promote the idea that every human being has the universal right to lead a dignified life. Visit our website at: www.globaldignity.ca.

For more information:

Olivia Bechthold
National Events Champion
media@globaldignity.ca
(613) 539-5489

 

 

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Celebrate Global Dignity Day With Empathy, Inclusion and Action

“A businessman, a professor, and a prince were talking… ”

It might sound like the start of a joke.

But when American entrepreneur John Hope Bryant, Finnish professor Pekka Himanen, and Crown Prince Haakon of Norway got together through the Young Global Leaders network of the World Economic Forum, the outcome was anything but a joke. It was seriously amazing.

The three friends bonded over their shared belief that human dignity is at the core of positive social change, and their shared desire to “operationalize” the concept into practical action. So in 2005, they created Global Dignity Day — a program for school-aged children to engage in candid conversations about what dignity means to them.

On October 21, 2015, such conversations will be happening in classrooms around the world. As the organizers explain, “Defining dignity in their own words and sharing stories from their own lives gives students ownership of the concept.” Last year, more than 350,000 young people in 60 countries took part, sharing stories on topics from helping others to bullying to identity.

In Canada, where Dignity Day events take place from Toronto to Arviat, I’ve seen first-hand how the idea of dignity speaks to young people in meaningful ways. Global Dignity Day reminds them that it’s okay to be different, and that they have inherent value and worth–no matter where they come from or what path they take in life. In words attributed to Aristotle, “Dignity consists not in possessing honors, but in the consciousness that we deserve them.” Dignity Day is consciousness-raising on a global scale.

And we need it–not just schoolchildren, but men and women of all ages. After all, many of us are privileged to be able to take the concept of dignity for granted, rarely, if ever, pausing to consider what dignity truly means–or how life would be different without it.

Yet a life of dignity is not guaranteed to everyone. Every day, all over the world, people are overlooked by their community and abandoned by wider society. And when people are degraded and made to feel “less than”–when they are deprived of their ability to take pride in their past or to find hope in their future–the result can be social isolation that further corrodes their sense of self-worth.

On October 5, 2015, officials in Ontario, Canada, opened one of the largest inquiries in the province’s history. Between 2000 and 2011, seven high school-aged First Nations students were found dead in Thunder Bay. These students, who hailed from remote northern communities, had been required to move to Thunder Bay for their schooling. The circumstances surrounding their deaths were never fully investigated–until now.

The inquest’s conclusions about these seven heartbreaking deaths will no doubt be complex. But I believe a common thread is already apparent. Allowing these young people to fall through the cracks, failing to provide closure to their families, and not doing more to prevent future tragedies represents a disregard for human dignity–a disregard that has painfully tarnished too much of Canada’s relationship with its indigenous peoples, and left too many First Nations youth feeling unvalued and unseen.

We must do better.

Dignity, to me, is rooted in both freedom and respect: the freedom to live as you choose based on what matters to you most, and the respect granted to your choices and your values by those around you. To live a dignified life is to be accepted by your peers and embraced by your wider community, and to have the opportunity to fulfill your true potential.

Moreover, one’s own dignity is indivisible from the dignity of others. As Archbishop Desmond Tutu has said, in describing the African concept of Ubuntu, “We belong in a bundle of life. We say, ‘a person is a person through other persons.'”

In other words, dignity and belonging are inextricably intertwined, and each requires the same three pathways for support: respect, recognition, and reciprocity. By enabling dialogue, Global Dignity Day opens the gate to those crucial pathways.

So on October 21, let’s all find a way to engage with our peers in this worldwide conversation about the importance of dignity. Let’s think deeply about the ways we can promote it. And let’s each do our part to support the dignity of all people, no matter their circumstance or condition. Let’s make this not just a day of empathy, but a day of inclusion and action.

You can learn more about Global Dignity Day, and download free teaching tools, here.

 

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Mrs. Universe Named Canadian Dignity Role Model

OTTAWA, September 21, 2015 – The first Canadian and First Nations woman to win the Mrs. Universe pageant, 25-year-old Ashley Callingbull-Burnham from Alberta’s Enoch Cree Nation, has been named a National Role Model by the international youth empowerment organization, Global Dignity Canada.

Callingbull-Burnham joins the ranks of The Hon. John Baird, former Minister of Foreign Affairs; Deputy Leader of the New Democratic Party, Megan Leslie; Liberal Party of Canada Leader Justin Trudeau and Inuit film maker Innosar Issakiark, who are just a few of the National Role Models and Champions that support Global Dignity in Canada. 

“It is a great honor for me to work with students around the world to promote the concept that everyone has the right to lead a dignified life,” said Callingbull-Burnham.

From Harvard University to TED Talks, Callingbull-Burnham speaks to youth around the world about her life, ambitions, self-esteem, health and education. She graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree focusing on drama and acting/television. Callingbull-Burnham is a recipient of the Top 20 Under 30 Award.

Amongst her accomplishments, Burnham was also chosen as Miss Canada for the Miss
Friendship International Pageant held in Hubei, China in September, 2010, and represented Canada at the Queen of the World Final held in Germany 2010. She also represented Canada at Miss Humanity International in Barbados in October 2011.

Established in 2005 by HRH Crown Prince Haakon of Norway, Operation HOPE Founder John Hope Bryant and respected Finnish professor Pekka Himanen, Global Dignity is an independent, non-profit, non-political organization focused on empowering young people with dignity. It aims to inspire respect, self-esteem and tolerance of diversity, as well as promote the idea that every human being has the universal right to lead a dignified life.

Teachers and young leaders across the country and globally are invited to join over 400,000 students in celebrating Global Dignity Day on October 21st, 2015, by hosting school-wide or classroom specific events. Free materials to host a workshop and the registration form can be found at: www.globaldignity.ca.

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For more information, please contact:

Olivia Bechthold
National Events Champion
Global Dignity Canada
olivia@globaldignity.ca
613-539-5489

 

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Global Dignity 2014 with Arviat TV

 

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Arviat youth use art workshops to discuss difficult topics

Young people in Arviat, Nunavut, are using painting, throat singing, drum dancing and storytelling to connect with their community and express their feelings on difficult topics, like alcoholism, suicide and food insecurity.

TakingITGlobal, a non-governmental organization that focuses on empowering youth around the globe, visited the hamlet last week to host the workshops and celebrate Global Dignity Day.

Jennifer Corriero, co-founder and executive director of TakingITGlobal, says people in Arviat, which has a population of about 2,400, were able to look at a “Moments of Inclusion” art exhibit, before putting their own paintbrushes to paper.

“It was a very inclusive way to discuss some issues related to isolation, but even more importantly to be surrounded by images of hope and happiness,” said Corriero.

» See the full article on CBC.ca

 

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The World Economic Forum’s Ottawa Global Shapers share details of Global Dignity Day in Canada and the Less. More. campaign.

Today Global Dignity Day is being celebrated in 71 countries by over 400,000 students!

Here in Canada, Global Shapers Hubs from coast-to-coast have teamed up in supporting our national videoconference connecting 2,000 students across eight schools in sharing their dignity stories. The event can be streamed live here from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm EST.

This morning also marks one month since Global Dignity launched the globally crowdsourced Less. More. youth empowerment campaign in partnership with Ottawa-based tech startup, PlayMC2, which was Co-Founded by Ottawa Global Shaper and Canadian Global Dignity Country Chair, Giovanna Mingarelli. View the Less. More. launch video on YouTube.

» READ THE FULL POST ON GLOBALSHAPERS.ORG

 

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Global Dignity Canada Country Chair, Giovanna Mingarelli, shares details of the Global Dignity Less. More. campaign

Coverage on CBC Radio-Canada’s Ottawa Morning Show (October 15, 2014): http://goo.gl/bcjNh0
[Audio] A story about Global Dignity Day 2014 by CKCU, Carleton University’s radio station, featuring Juno Award-winning musician, Jesse Stewart, former Senator Landon Pearson and Chair of Global Dignity Canada, Giovanna Mingarelli. See 13:45 min (October 15th, 2014).

 

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Thousands of Students Crowdsource Global Dignity Day in Canada

Press Release
For Immediate Release

OTTAWA, October 15, 2013 – Today thousands of students across Canada will join more than 400,000 of their peers in 71 countries in the celebration of Global Dignity Day (GDD).

“This year’s GDD will encourage students around the world to use social media to spread positivity and infuse their world with small acts of dignity,” said Giovanna Mingarelli, the Chair of Global Dignity Day Canada.

“Too many kids experience bullying, whether at school, in their personal lives or online. Educating our students about dignity and empathy will help foster caring and collaborative environments that are respectful of diversity.”

This year’s Global Dignity Canada national capital event, hosted by 1125@Carleton University, brings together 100 students from Regina Street Public School in Ottawa, Kitigan Zibi School and Carleton University. During the event, more than 2,000 students in eight schools from coast to coast will be connected as part of an international videoconference. Starting at 11 a.m., the videoconference livestream can be viewed at: https://new.livestream.com/takingitglobal/events/3490850.

During the videoconference, workshops will be conducted as part of the globally crowdsourced Less. More. Campaign. The campaign was created pro bono for Global Dignity by New York-based ad agency, BBDO, and is focused on reducing negativity online and infusing the world with small acts of dignity on the PlayMC2 mobile app.

“Global Dignity is using social media in a positive way, turning a weapon of insult and injury into a balm of peace and positive communication,” said Carleton University President, Dr. Roseann Runte in a letter of endorsement.

Established in 2005 by HRH Crown Prince Haakon of Norway, Operation HOPE Founder John Hope Bryant and respected Finnish professor Pekka Himanen, Global Dignity is an independent, non-profit, non-political organization focused on empowering young people with dignity.

Over the past several years, Global Dignity Day Canada has developed partnerships with leading youth-focused organizations such as: TakingITGlobal, Right To Play, the Canadian Commission to UNESCO, YMCA Canada, Adobe Youth Voices and the World Economic Forum’s Canadian Global Shapers Community. For more information, please visit www.globaldignity.ca.

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Media Inquiries:
Tim Vail
tim@mcrowdsourcing.com
Cell: 613-668‐0404

 

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Promoting Malala’s Vision for Youth Through Global Dignity Day

By Giovanna Mingarelli

On Friday night, Malala Yousafzai shared her thoughts on being the youngest recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize — along with Indian children’s rights activist Kailash Satyarthi — at the Library of Birmingham in the UK.

In her opening lines, the 17-year-old Pakistani role model and female education activist discussed one of the pillars that form the foundation of her work.

Namely, it doesn’t matter the language you speak, the color of your skin or what religion you believe in — what matters is we should all consider each other as human beings and respect each other as such.

This is a particularly important message for youth.

» Read the full article on Huffington Post

 

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Global Dignity Day Canada

The Mission of Global Dignity is to implement the universal right of every human being to lead a dignified life. We all have the ability to increase the dignity of others and thus we increase our own dignity. The more dignity we have, the brighter our world will be.

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  • Global Dignity Day Canada Partners-image
  • Global Dignity Day Canada Partners-image
  • Global Dignity Day Canada Partners-image
  • Global Dignity Day Canada Partners-image
  • Global Dignity Day Canada Partners-image
  • Global Dignity Day Canada Partners-image
  • Global Dignity Day Canada Partners-image
  • Global Dignity Day Canada Partners-image
  • Global Dignity Day Canada Partners-image
  • Global Dignity Day Canada Partners-image
  • Global Dignity Day Canada Partners-image
  • Global Dignity Day Canada Partners-image
  • Global Dignity Day Canada Partners-image
  • Global Dignity Day Canada Partners-image
  • Global Dignity Day Canada Partners-image
  • Global Dignity Day Canada Partners-image
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Global Dignity Day Canada Partners

We would like to thank and recognize the Global Dignity Organizational and Strategic Partners that have actively supported our operations to promote dignity across Canada and around the world!